How Do Our Beliefs in Math Affect Our Students?

I was honored to work with amazing teachers this week. We took a survey from NCTM (National Council Teachers of Mathematics) on our beliefs regarding student learning and our instructional practices in mathematics. This, in itself, led to amazing discussions about what we truly believe math IS and how we interpret that into instructional decisions within our classrooms.

But then we took it further. We got into groups and discussed not so much whether we agreed or disagreed, but whether it was a productive or unproductive belief in respect to student access and learning.  Here are two to consider:

There were fantastic discussions about these particular ones, especially for educators of EL and SPED. We also considered how parents might respond to these. Powerful conversations around access, flexibility in thinking, understanding conceptual and procedural mathematical ideas, and yes, fluency.

Here was the point. Our beliefs, whether productive or unproductive, affect our attitudes towards mathematics and the children we are blessed to teach. Those attitudes affect the actions we take. Who gets to answer which questions? Who gets the “tough” tasks and who has to keep doing drill and kill worksheets? Who gets to explore puzzles and who has to retake tests or do homework (because their home life doesn’t lend itself to being able to do it at home)? And those actions MATTER. They affect the results you will get from your students.

Belief chart

So as you gear up for this school year, consider taking the beliefs survey yourself. Even better, have your team take it and REALLY dive in to what beliefs are productive an unproductive. The more we reflect, the more we can grow and be effective at what we truly want; to teach students to love, learn and understand mathematics. Have a great year!

For the beliefs survey: 2017_06_19_Holstrom_Grady_2BeliefsSurvey

 

How Do Our Beliefs in Math Affect Our Students?

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